New Study Looks At How And Where French Become Infected With Covid

Author image

Nancy Heslin   Forbes Monaco

New Study Looks At How And Where French Become Infected With Covid

Photo: Nickolay Romensky

As Élysée Palace confirmed this morning that president Macron is Covid-19 positive and has been placed in isolation for seven days, a ComCor study conducted by the Institut Pasteur identifying places or behaviors that lead to an increased risk of infection was also released.

The study, which was carried out during the period of curfew and confinement, is the first French study that tackles how and in which situations the French may have been infected with Covid-19, although the results are preliminary and have not been published by a scientific journal.

Over the past weeks, restaurants in France have accused the government of basing their decision to close them down until after the holidays on a study that came out of Chicago before the state even went into lockdown and that the data was not relevant to the circumstances in France.

However, the ComCor report, based on responses from 30,330 people “having very likely been infected between October 17 to 30, 2020,” claims that “meals play a central role in these contaminations, whether in a family or friendly environment, or, to a lesser degree, professional.”

First and foremost, though, according to the data 35% of contaminations occur at home, when the source of the infection is known. In 64% of cases, it comes from the spouse. It is more difficult to know when it is comes from children, who, often asymptomatic, are not identified.

“44% of infected people know the source person who infected them.” When social distancing was slack, infection levels tended to be higher: family (33%), friends (21%) and colleagues (29%).

The study also notes that “only 54%” of those questioned self-isolated “from the first symptoms, and 64% when they knew they had knowledge of contact with an infected case.”

Some of the factors that showed increase risk include people living at home who have children in school or looked after outside the home, or who meet others physically, whether for professional or personal reasons.

Going to bars, restaurants, gyms and even carpooling also increase the risk factors identified by the study. However, going of shops does not seem to have increased the number of contaminations.

Read also
Monaco Economy ‘Continues To Be Impacted,’ Says IMSEE Director

Author image

Nancy Heslin   Forbes Monaco

Nancy Heslin is an established journalist and lifestyle writer. She has been the Editor-in-Chief of Forbes Monaco magazine (bimonthly in English) , since the magazine's 2nd issue . Launched in November 2018, Forbes Monaco is part of the Forbes family, with its 7 million readers and 71 million monthly website visitors worldwide.