Italy Announces Curfews And Closures As Europe Faces New Lockdowns

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Elana Lyn Gross   Forbes U.S. Staff

Italy Announces Curfews And Closures As Europe Faces New Lockdowns

Photo: Nicole Reyes/ Unsplash

Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte on Monday announced new coronavirus restrictions, the Associated Press reported, becoming the latest European country to institute new measures because of a sharp increase in coronavirus cases.

KEY FACTS

- Unlike the earlier lockdown, the restrictions will vary based on the number of cases and hospitalizations in the region, Conte said, according to AP. 

-  Conte said there will be a “late evening” curfew, though he didn’t specify a time, and said high schools could go from primarily remote to completely remote so fewer people will be reliant on public transportation. 

- Conte said malls will close on weekends with the exception of certain stores and museums will close again.

- The new restrictions come as there were a record 183,553 new coronavirus cases in Italy last week, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

KEY BACKGROUND

The leaders of France, Italy, the England and Germany have all announced new rules aimed at curbing the sharp increase in coronavirus cases. German Chancellor Angela Merkel on October 28 announced that German officials agreed to implement a four-week shutdown starting November 2. People are recommended to stay home, although schools and daycares will be open, according to CNN. French President Emmanuel Macron announced new lockdown measures on October 28 which went into effect on October 30 and will be in place until at least December 1. Non-essential workers are expected to stay home aside from essential errands, doctor appointments or one-hour of daily exercise although people can go to work if they are unable to work from home and schools will stay open, according to Reuters. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on October 31 announced the country would go back into lockdown starting November 5 and lasting until at least December 2. Under the new regulations, people will be required to stay home with certain exceptions such as school and daycare, nonessential stores and entertainment venues will close and bars and restaurants will close except for takeout. 

BIG NUMBER

709,335. That’s how many confirmed coronavirus cases there have been in Italy since the start of the pandemic, according to Johns Hopkins University data. Nearly 40,000 people have died.

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Elana Lyn Gross   Forbes U.S. Staff

I'm a breaking news reporter at Forbes and the author of What Next?: Your Five-Year Plan for Life After College published by the Simon & Schuster imprint Adams Media. I have a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University and live on the Upper West Side.