Allowance, Savings, Baguette And Beer

Author image

Nancy Heslin   Forbes Monaco

Allowance, Savings, Baguette And Beer

Photo: Flikr Nicola

A study by Pixpay, the payment card for 10- to 18-year-olds, shows 29% of parents are happy to give their teenage children an allowance for certain household chores, for an average of €6.80 per task.

Doing the dishes (€3.28 on average), setting the table (€2.43), taking out the trash (€3.90), cooking (€8.90) and mowing the lawn or weeding the garden (€4.70) are part of 8 out of 10 tasks that can result in a “reward.”

Teens are mostly asked to do household chores (58% for laundry, taking out the garbage) followed by kitchen help (23% for setting the table and dishes), the garden (10% for mowing, watering the plants, weeding) and other domestic chores (9% for DIY, car cleaning, and shopping).

However, adolescents earn the most for getting good grades (an average of €18.70, nearly double that of last year) than for good behavior (€6.40). They are also rewarded for “reading books regularly” at €9.70 on average.

The study, which took place between April 20 and July 19, also showed that boys needed more motivation for good behavior than girls, 14% and 10% respectively.

As for adults, an Ifop survey for the Journal du Dimanche has reported that less than four in ten French people say they can put money aside for monthly savings after paying rent, water, electricity, gas, internet and food bills.

Only 39% of the French are able to save each month, down from 44% in 2014 and 54% in 2010. This includes 33% of employees (-10 points compared to 2014), 23% of manual workers (-15 points compared to 2014) and 21% of those earning less of €900 per month are able to put something aside every month.

Breaking down the figures according to political opinions, 56% of those who support the Right say they can save, while only 42% of Left supporters can say the same, which is twice as many as those of Le Rassemblement national (former Front national) at 22%.

The poll shows that fewer women are able to save compared to men (31% and 47% respectively) while those under 35 are more likely to save (45%) than those 35 and over (36%).

And it will be harder to save on food bills as wheat prices continue to skyrocket, up 34% already from the same time last year. The average price of a baguette in France is €0.89 per 250 grams with a baker typically spending 18 cents on flour per baguette. With the increase, the same baker is now spending 25 cents on wheat to make the same baguette. Plus with the rise in costs for energy and paper for wrapping the bread, the price of a baguette is expected to go up 10 cents (50 cents for multigrain) over the coming weeks to €0.99 per 250 grams. The beloved baguette has never in its history cost more than a euro (even in the French franc equivalent) and although there is no national price regulation, boulangeries are by law required to show the price per kilo.

And while the French drink on average 30 liters of  beer annually, beer lovers can expect to pay more for their ale as the price of barley, metal caps, glass bottles, label paper and steel for the fermentation tanks have also increased steadily over the past months.

Author image

Nancy Heslin   Forbes Monaco

Nancy Heslin is an established journalist and lifestyle writer. She has been the Editor-in-Chief of Forbes Monaco magazine (bimonthly in English) , since the magazine's 2nd issue . Launched in November 2018, Forbes Monaco is part of the Forbes family, with its 7 million readers and 71 million monthly website visitors worldwide.